Healing Places: Abstract Landscapes Evoke Comfort for Difficult Times

Measha Vieth

“Mount Timpanogos” by Madison Sorge
“Mount Timpanogos” by Madison Sorge

One of artist Madison Sorge’s most prized photos is of her mother teaching her how to trace a drawing. Then, before she knew it, she was competing in art shows in kindergarten.

“Landscapes can communicate so much peace to the soul or to a home, they can express how you feel or want to feel when people can’t verbally communicate those emotions.” – artist Madison Sorge

Madison took after her parents who drew and painted as a hobby, a habit that followed her throughout school. She participated in a variety of art courses at DeLong Middle School and Memorial High School. In school, her teachers Kathy Barreis and Jenna Ruder made a huge impact on her artwork. AP Studio Art became her favorite class and brought her close to a group of friends she shared the experience with.

“I believe the most important thing art can do is connect you to the world around you and to other people,” Sorge said. “It has brought me so many great relationships and memories.”

Landscapes are one of Sorge’s greatest loves and the primary subject that will be featured in her show, “Healing Places,” which opens at the Volume One Gallery, 205 N. Dewey St., Eau Claire, with a reception  from 6:30-8:30pm on Friday, Jan. 11. As Madison was healing from post-traumatic stress disorder due to sexual assault and rape in college, she turned to painting abstract landscapes.

“Blue Sea” by Madison Sorge
“Blue Sea”

“Landscapes can communicate so much peace to the soul or to a home, they can express how you feel or want to feel when people can’t verbally communicate those emotions,” Sorge said. “I hope that in sharing my story I can help others along their own healing journeys to find peace and their own voice.”

Her pieces reflect feelings associated with a place or memory. Colors and textures are chosen to correspond with these feelings. Tools and materials range from brushes, pallet knives, and cloth for calm and mellow effects to charcoal, sticks, sponges, and textured materials to resemble stress and excitement.

Sorge
Sorge

One of Madison’s favorite pieces, titled “Hobble Creek Canyon,” will be on display at the show. Created at her parents’ former home in Springville, Utah, it represents looking out at the mountains. “I did a lot of healing in that home and spent much of my time sitting on the edge of our property taking in the landscape,” she said.

Hobble Creek Canyon, along with many more pieces will be for sale at the Volume One show. View Madison’s paintings, photography, and more on her website: madisongalestudio.com.